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Marsy's Law and Issue 2 to learn their fate on Election Day

Marsy's Law, would change Ohio's constitution to give the victims of crimes more rights.{ }Supporters of Issue 2, want everyone on a state healthcare plan to pay the same price as Veterans Affairs for prescriptions. (MGN)

Voters across Ohio will decide the fate of two ballot initiatives. Campaigns have spent tens of millions of dollars trying to convince voters to side with them.

Issue 1, called Marsy's Law, would change Ohio's constitution to give the victims of crimes more rights.

"It makes them equal, nothing more and nothing less," said Chris Albanese, the political director for Marsy's Law for Ohio. "We find that when people really understand that information when we get to educate them, they're very supportive of this campaign."

Albanese and about a dozen volunteers were going door to door passing our fliers in Circleville Monday afternoon.

"It's great to be our here actually talking to voters," he said.

The campaign is named after a California college student who was shot and killed by her ex-boyfriend in the 1980's. Her family ran into her killer in public because they were never notified he had been released.

Marsy's Law would ensure victims of crime they would be notified when offenders come up for parole or are released.

There's no organized or financed opposition campaign it supporters have been campaigning anyway.

"There's a lot of excitement coming into Election Day," Albanese said. "We're very excited about what's going to happen when the polls close tomorrow and we just can wait for the victory we're expecting."

Meanwhile Issue 2 has turned into a multi-million dollar fight over the price of prescription drugs. Supporters of that ballot initiative want everyone on a state healthcare plan to pay the same price as Veterans Affairs for prescriptions.

"It has worked for the VA for 25 years," said Dennis Willard with the Yes on Issue 2 campaign. "We're adopting the VA system and it'll work here in Ohio."

That campaign has been funded by a California billionaire Michael Weinstein. Unlike Marsy's Law, Issue 2 has an opposing campaign funded by a group representing the pharmaceutical industry.

"What we had to do is explain to people why something that sounds good on the surface will actually be to the detriment of our state and its people," said Dale Butland with the No on Issue 2 campaign.

Butland's campaign has aired millions of dollars in TV ads arguing Issue 2 would hurt veterans who get their prescriptions through the VA and could raise drug prices for everyone else. He's confident his side is on track for a win Tuesday.

"I feel pretty good about where we are but you never know until the votes are counted," he said.

Nearly 8000 people voted early in person at the Franklin County Board of Elections. Turnout a year after a presidential election is typically low but the 2017 turnout before Election Day is nearly three times higher than the simile election held in 2013.

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