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Marsy's Law faces hurdles before going into effect

Marsy's Law would give crime victims the right to make sure they're notified when their attacker is in court or before a parole board. (WSYX/WTTE)

Voters overwhelmingly approved Marsy's Law, the crime victims' rights bill, on Election Night. More than 80 percent over voters supported the change to the Ohio Constitution. Marsy's Law would give crime victims the right to make sure they're notified when their attacker is in court or before a parole board.

"The statement from the voters last night, we had 82 percent support which is a record for a state issue," said Aaron Marshall with the Marsy's Law for Ohio campaign.

The State of Ohio has 90 days to put Marsy's Law into effect.

"Some of the details on that still need to be ironed out," he said. "When voters speak as loudly as they did yesterday, I think the legislature will take notice. If you're doing your job right now you probably shouldn't see any more costs but there are probably a few places that'll have to reshuffle some priorities and do some things differently."

Critics of the proposal said the State will also need to decide whether victims will get their own lawyers and whether the State will be required to pay for it. The ACLU of Ohio said Wednesday it will review Marsy's Law to see whether it believes it violates the Ohio Constitution. The organization could file a lawsuit in the future. The group said it had concerns Marsy's Law might infringe upon the rights of people accused of a crime.

Other states that have adopted Marsy's Law have made "Marsy's cards". Police officers or prosecutors could give that card to a victim so they would know what their rights are.

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