Ohio Fruit Farmers Feeling the Impact of the Polar Vortex

Updated: Monday, July 7 2014, 06:35 PM EDT
Ohio Fruit Farmers Feeling the Impact of the Polar Vortex story image
PATASKALA (Andrew Michael) -- Lynd fruit farm in Pataskala is just wrapping up their berry season. Blackberries did not make it through the cold temperatures, but blueberries, red raspberries, and black raspberries did survive.

Other fruit that did not survive anywhere in Ohio were the peaches. The closest peach crop that survived is from Pennsylvania. If you go to a farmers market and buy peaches you should expect to pay about 10-20% more this year because of the reduced crop, and the fact that they will have to be shipped to Ohio.
 
Lester Lynd said that fruit farms in Ohio do not depend on peaches because they often will freeze out. Lynd's rely heavily on apples for their primary cash crop. Lester said that there is a huge demand for Honey Crisp apples and it is hard to keep up. They planted an additional 7,000 Honey Crisp trees this year. 

He also said they're trying a new variety of apples, called Ever Crisp, that was just developed last year. They have a few hundred of the trees, but they are still very small trees. The new breed is a mix between Honey Crisp and Fuji, and can stay crisp in your fruit bowl for several months. Keep an eye out for those in the coming years, because he says that they will be the next big thing when it comes to apples.
Ohio Fruit Farmers Feeling the Impact of the Polar Vortex
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