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Family uses tragedy to donate machine meant to extend time with stillborn children

A little more than a year after losing a twin to stillbirth, the Millers donated a CuddleCot to OhioHealth Grady Memorial hospital in Delaware, which previously didn't have one. (Courtesy: Miller family)

Losing a baby unexpectedly can be extremely devastating for a family. The Miller family knows what that pain feels like because they experienced it firsthand.

Mike and Melissa Miller were expecting twin boys: Henry and Owen.

When Melissa was 36 weeks into the pregnancy, she became ill and had to be taken to a hospital. The Millers said when the twins' heartbeats were checked: Owen's was the only one that could be found. When they lost Henry to stillbirth after delivering the twins, it was as if their entire world stopped.

The Millers said they'll never get over the tragedy of their son, but they did get a chance to spend more time with Henry all thanks to a CuddleCot. The device they used allowed Henry's body to cool to a level where the family could be with him in the room for how ever long they wanted to. The Millers were able to have Henry and Owen together in the room while family visited, they were able to take pictures and say a final goodbye. The Millers spent four days in the hospital with Henry until it was time for them to discharge from the hospital.

"More time with him was the greatest gift than the tragedy of the loss of our son," said Mike Miller.

"It didn't matter if they were uncomfortable. They were going to hold my son because you came here to see Owen who is living, but Henry is here too and I grew him for 36 weeks," said Melissa Miller.

It was an experience the Miller's said their family embraced and will always be grateful for.

A little more than a year later, the Millers donated a CuddleCot to OhioHealth Grady Memorial hospital in Delaware. The hospital didn't have a CuddleCot and the Millers wanted to help out.

The Millers began fundraising for the CuddleCot after their tragedy to have it for others dealing with a similar situation.

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