Local educators react to White House school security plan

The Trump Administration plan would train some teachers to carry guns, aim to improve background checks, provide more mental health care and create a commission to study school violence. (MGN)

The White House surprised many educators by unveiling a new plan to protect students over the weekend. The Trump Administration plan would train some teachers to carry guns, aim to improve background checks, provide more mental health care and create a commission to study school violence.

Educators knew a plan was coming but didn't expect it to arrive Sunday.

"Everybody is trying to unpack it and determine what it means for them at this point," said Jennifer Hogue, the director of legislative services for the Ohio School Board Association. "The more people are talking about it the more likely we are to see something happen. Mental health services not only serve a school safety purpose but also to make sure those students are best prepared to learn and are getting their needs met."

The White House plan addresses mental health like Hogue said is needed but the plan lacks details about how to solve many other issues.

"The devil will be in the details," she said.

Hogue said school security is decided on the local level so, whatever Washington decides to do, she hopes the final decision will be made locally.

"When you have a commission looking at something nationwide, what does that mean for Ohio and how is that going to be implemented here?" she said.

The Trump Administration backed away from raising the age to buy an assault weapon from 18 to 21 years old. A day before creating the commission to study school safety, President Trump made fun of commissions during a rally in Pennsylvania saying they just "talk, talk, talk".

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