Immigration fight, tension on tariffs await Congress' return

FILE- This March 30, 2017, file photo shows the Capitol Dome at dawn in Washington. Congress returns to work Monday, June 4, 2018, facing a showdown in the House over immigration while Senate Republicans are trying to stop an all-out trade war after President Donald Trump’s decision to impose import tariffs on close U.S. allies. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)

WASHINGTON (AP) — This was supposed to be the quiet time on Capitol Hill, but Congress returns to work Monday facing a showdown in the House over immigration while Senate Republicans are trying to stop an all-out trade war after President Donald Trump's decision to impose import tariffs on close U.S. allies.

Tensions are running particularly high as Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is threatening to cancel the traditional August recess as he fights Democratic opposition to GOP priorities in a show of busy-work before the midterm election.

It's shaping up to be far from the typical summer slowdown when legislating usually makes way for campaigning.

"Another summer, another heavy work load," tweeted Sen. Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, as he pushed to confirm nominations. "NOW is the time to vote on Fridays (even wknds!)." The Senate often is not in session on Fridays.

Congress faces a few should-do items in the weeks ahead. Topping the agenda is passage of the annual defense bill, which includes pay raises for the troops. It has already cleared the House. The Senate could begin consideration of its defense bill this week. But the Senate version carries a warning to Trump with a trade provision to block any White House plan to lift penalties on the China-based telecommunications company ZTE, which faces trade law violations over selling sensitive technologies to U.S. adversaries.

Trump's moves on trade are expected to consume conversations among Senate Republicans this week. They're worried about a wider trade war spiking prices for home-state businesses and consumers if Trump imposes steel and aluminum tariffs, as planned, on imports from Canada, Mexico and the European Union.

Republicans will be making the case to the administration that the tariffs could dampen the economic gains from the GOP tax cuts and sour the mood among voters as lawmakers are campaigning to protect the Republican majority in Congress.

Some Republicans are also hoping Trump simply changes his mind and doesn't follow through with it. But aides said others may be signing on to a bill from Sen. Mike Lee, R-Utah, that would subject all trade actions by the executive branch, including tariffs, to congressional approval. Rep. Will Hurd, R-Texas, said he would support a similar move in the House. "Congress has shared our responsibility when it comes to trade with the executive branch over the last couple of decades, and I think that's something that we need to re-evaluate," he told CBS' "Face the Nation."

Meanwhile, House Republicans face a self-imposed deadline Thursday for resolving an immigration standoff between GOP centrists who are forcing a vote on legislation to protect young immigrants who were brought to the country illegally as children and conservatives who want stricter immigration enforcement with money for Trump's border wall.

The centrists want to provide a way for the young immigrants to become permanent residents, which can lead to citizenship. Conservatives are opposed to creating a new pathway to staying in the U.S. permanently, equating it with granting amnesty to lawbreakers.

Speaker Paul Ryan, R-Wis., and Majority Leader Kevin McC